History


Introduction

The Directory Server project dates back to 1996, when Netscape hired the inventor of LDAP, Tim Howes, and his colleagues such as Mark Smith and Gordon Good from the University of Michigan. In 1999 AOL acquired Netscape and formed the iPlanet Alliance with Sun to jointly develop Netscape servers. From 1999 to 2001 the Netscape Directory Server team worked with Sun’s Directory Server team, and later the Innosoft Directory Server (IDDS) team, in the U.S. in Santa Clara, CA and Austin, TX and in Grenoble, France on Directory Server and related products such as Meta Directory and Directory Access Router. The iPlanet alliance ended in October 2001, and Sun and Netscape forked the code base. From 2001 to 2004 the Netscape Directory Server team invested heavily on performance and multimaster replication. In December 2004, the Netscape Directory Server was acquired by Red Hat.

In the late 1990s, as Linux started to gain acceptance in companies, Netscape Directory Server was the first Netscape server to be officially released on Linux. In 2001 there was an effort at AOL’s Strategic Business Solutions unit to improve Netscape server performance on Red Hat Linux. The team has a long history with Linux.

Feature History

Features Present in 2001

Features added in Netscape DS 6.1 (2002)

Features added in Netscape DS 6.2 (2003)

Features added in Netscape DS 6.21 (early 2004)

Features added in Netscape DS 7.0 (late 2004 - unreleased)

Features added in Fedora DS 7.1 (June 1, 2005 - first open source release)

Features added in Fedora DS 1.0 (December 8, 2005)

Features added in Fedora DS 1.0.2 (February 20, 2006)

Features added in Fedora DS 1.0.3 (October 10, 2006)

Features added in Fedora DS 1.0.4 (November 8, 2006)

Features added in Fedora DS 1.1 (January 8, 2008)

service dirsrv {start|stop|restart} [instance name] service dirsrv-admin {start|stop|restart} edit /etc/sysconfig/dirsrv or /etc/sysconfig/dirsrv-admin to set environment

Features added in Fedora DS 1.2.0 - April 3, 2009

Features added in 389 DS 1.2.1 - August 17, 2009

NOTE: This is the first release that is branded as 389. All of the RPMs have been marked as obsoleting their Fedora DS counterparts. When upgrading via yum, you must use yum upgrade (not update) so that the obsoletes will be processed.

NOTE: 389-console is the command to run the console. This replaces fedora-idm-console.

Features added in 389 DS 1.2.2 - August 26, 2009

This was a bug fix release - no new features.

Features added in 389 DS 1.2.3 - October 7, 2009

Features added in 389 DS 1.2.4 - November 4, 2009

Features added in 389 DS 1.2.5 - January 13, 2010

Features added in 389 DS 1.2.6 - September 13, 2010

Version 1.2.7

Version 1.2.8

Mostly bug fixes

Version 1.2.9

Version 1.2.10

Version 1.2.11

Version 1.3.0

Version 1.3.0 of 389-ds-base adds the following new features:

The full list of tickets addressed in version 1.3.0 is available at https://fedorahosted.org/389/report/14

2014

… …

Initial Release

The initial release of Fedora Directory Server (version 7.1) was 6/1/2005. This included the source code to the complete Directory Server engine. It also included pre-built binaries (on selected platforms) for the admin server daemon and the console administration front-end, but not the source code for those. The entire product was open sourced on 12/1/2005 as Fedora Directory Server version 1.0 - see Release Notes for more information about that release, which uses Apache as the admin server daemon. This was a week short of a year since Red Hat acquired the Directory Server from AOL, fulfilling the promise Red Hat made when it acquired the code to open source it within the year.

Last modified on 7 August 2014